Top 4 Viral Tumblr Blogs

       by Brandy D. Anderson

Source: thegeometricfox

Source: thegeometricfox

Every so often, Tumblr releases a list of the most popular and viral blogs on its platform. This is determined by the amount of “likes” and reblogs each Tumblr page receives. From cracking secret media codes to classical artsy texts, I’ve compiled a list of the four best viral Tumblrs over the last year.

 

If Paintings Could Text

Source: brigwer

Source: brigwer

About: “A Revival of Classical Art and Epic Texts”

Adding fake and funny text messages to pictures, usually production stills from tv shows or movies, has been popular for a few years now. However, this blog takes that idea and applies it to the wonderful and wacky world of classical art, which usually results in some pretty hilarious images. For instance, today’s post features Gustave Courbet’s classic painting The Desperate Man from 1845 (am I the only one who thinks the man looks remarkably like Johnny Depp?) with the text message: “Just realized I lost my social security card… Maybe someone else will do something with my life.”

One of the great things about this blog is that it actually cites each painting, artist, and the year of the represented painting, which is particularly nice since many other sites forgo such citations. Another painting is Peter Paul Rubens’ 1610 Samson and Delilah with the caption: “Well, it ended with me crying outside the strip club saying I don’t want to be 21 anymore. I’d say it was a great 21s birthday.” I also couldn’t help but laugh at Eva Gonzales’ Woman Awakening from 1876: “I’m still laying in bed cuz I don’t feel like adulting yet.” The one that probably made me laugh the most, however, is the caption for 1776’s Joseph Siffred Duplessis’ Madame de Saint-Maurice: “I ate one of your animal crackers. Just one. Ok four. But no frosting. Ok frosting.”

 

TL;DR WIKIPEDIA

Source: jdurham

Source: jdurham

About: “Wikipedia: Condensed for your pleasure.”

This enormously popular blog is funny and will probably give you a case of the giggles as you read through the posts. The concept is to take Wikipedia entries and shorten them into snarky little one or two sentence summaries with the accompanying Wiki photograph. Here are some examples: “Presidents Day: Presidents Day is an annual U.S. Holiday honoring those in the market for a new mattress or car”, “Roman numerals: Roman numerals are an ancient Roman system of organizing Super Bowls”, “Fitbit: A Fitbit is how people who used to wear ‘Livestrong’ bracelets are looking stupid in 2015”, “Gift receipt: A gift receipt is how you’re going to turn all these crappy gifts into sweet, sweet booze”, “Cousins: A cousin is the child of one of your parent’s siblings who you’ve got to admit was looking pretty hot at Christmas”.

Another chuckle-inducing post: “Cards Against Humanity: Cards Against Humanity is unfortunately one of the more comfortable ways to interact with your relatives over the holidays”. This blog helps you deal with holiday stress: “X-Mas: Ugh. Fine, Christmas. Jesus Christ, lighten up”, “Chanukah: See also: Hanukkah, Chanukkah, and Hannukka maybe: I don’t even really know the spellings at this point”, and “Caroling: Caroling is proof you’re not even safe from Christmas music inside your own home”. You’ll also find some politically provocative posts: “Lisa Ann: Lisa Anne is a former American pornographic actress, best known for portraying Sarah Palin as both a character and a metaphor for what she would have done to the country if she’d ever become President” and “Time’s Person of the Year: Time’s Person of the Year is a distinction Barack Obama and Hitler actually have in common.”

 

It’s Like They Know Us

Source: jeltovski

Source: jeltovski

About: “Relax on your pristine white couch and enjoy these realistic depictions of motherhood.”

This blog takes stock photos and adds hilarious, and often biting, commentary to each one. One of the latest posts features a mother relaxing in a comfy chair, with a mug of coffee, smiling as she looks down upon her child confined inside a bizarre mesh (?) and barred thing that looks more like a cage or kennel than some sort of a playpen. The commentary beneath the photo: “Sit back and enjoy a hot cup of coffee as you casually observe your child in her brand new Baby Containment Module! Baby Containment Module fits seamlessly into any décor, and baby will be happy to play for hours without hanging white-knuckled from the sides, wailing like a wild snot-covered banshee whose only goal is to keep you from going to the bathroom. Baby Containment Module, it’s everywhere you want them to be.”

There’s another odd stock photo of a very pregnant woman wearing an unbuttoned pin-striped suit, her belly hanging out and she’s beginning to write something on her stomach with a sharpie…really. The commentary added to this one: “It’s a good idea to get organized before the baby’s arrival. Try labeling important items so you can easily find them later.” There’s another wacky stock photo of a man with a cheesy grin holding a baby like a football, as if he’s presenting the little runt to the woman standing before them. The caption: “Well then perhaps I can interest you in this model? This one is self cleaning AND boasts 25% fewer waste emissions.” Perhaps, though, the one which will make any soon-to-be mom laugh shows a pregnant woman, hand on belly, looking over a grocery list in the market: “Let’s see…something with enough calcium and folate, nothing unpasturized, should have omega 3’s, need to be careful about pesticides, probably whole wheat, enough fat but not too much fat, and can’t irritate my acid relux, nausea, or constipation. So that means I can eat…nothing.”

 

Source Code in TV and Films

Source: Alvimann

Source: Alvimann

About: “Images of the computer code appearing in TV and films and what they really are.”

This blog is so great because I can’t tell you how many times I’ve watched a show or movie, a code flashes on the screen, and I always wonder if it actually means anything or if it’s just jibberish. Well, this blog answers that question. Each post begins with a large screen cap of the computer code, identification of which tv show or movie it comes from, followed by an explanation (and it’s usually a bit funny) of what the code means.

An example: There’s a photo of a complicated code with the caption: “From CSI: Cyber S1E5 Crowd Sourced. Supposedly, this is the source code of a web site that interfaces with a bomb – and more specifically, a ‘dead man’s switch’ that immediately detonates the bomb if any of the code is modified. Honestly, any comment I could possibly make on this isn’t going to be as funny as the code itself.” Another photo bears the commentary: “Bits of Javascript/jQuery/HTML mixed with some random spam in the Doctor Who episode The Bells of Saint John. Seems to be using the Supersubs/Superfish jQuery plugin. Apparently, this code uploads human souls to the cloud?” There’s also one that I’m assuming contains a nice little inside joke to Stargate Atlantis: “Stargate Atlantis lockout password screen. Maybe the password is used to create decryption matrix :)”